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Understanding Civic Unrest in Baltimore, 1968-2015

Resources (at Decker Library and elsewhere) for investigating the history of Baltimore, Baltimore '68 riots, and the Baltimore Uprising of 2015.

Photo Essays

THE DAY AFTER: CLEANING UP IN BALTIMORE
Alan Taylor, April 28, 2015, The Atlantic

Photographs by photographers from AFP, AP, Reuters, and Getty Images of the clean-up efforts happening in Baltimore after the unrest.


NATIONWIDE REMEMBRANCES OF FERGUSON, ONE YEAR LATER
Emma Patti Harris, August 10, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun

Photographs of the Ferguson, Missouri area, one year after a white police officer named Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, a black 18-year-old who was unarmed.


IN BALTIMORE'S SANDTOWN-WINCHESTER, 'EVERY DAY IS KATRINA'
Kalani Gordon, May 19, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun

Photographs of every day life in the Baltimore neighborhood of Sandtown-Winchester after the unrest.


BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE FREDDIE GRAY INVESTIGATION
Kalani Gordon, May 11, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun

"The Baltimore Sun was granted exclusive access to a task force responsible for the investigation of Freddie Grays death and monitored the investigation for days. The Sun agreed not to publish details about the investigation until Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby decided whether to prosecute any of the officers involved in the Gray incident, though reporters continued to use other sources for information. On Friday, she announced charges against six officers."



GRAY IN BLACK & WHITE

J.M. Giordano, May 8, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"I watched the Freddie Gray protests unfold with two different eyes. One eye kept a watch over editorial photos for the
Baltimore City Paper and the other looked out for shots that would evoke the raw energy of the events best rendered in black and white.

Much like Magnum photographer Gilles Peress’ seminal work Telex Iran, my black and white photos are more about mood, anger, time, and rage stripped of color. I do not shoot zoom, which is to say that all my lenses are “prime” or fixed so I have to get close to the action to get these photos. Sometimes I get too close.

Many aren’t “sharp” or “crisp” and that’s the intention. To make the viewer feel them as if they were right there, in the battle zone, not as if they’re staring at perfect photos on a newspaper page. I’m posting the photos daily on a Tumblr called Gray in Black & White.


J.M. Giordano is the photo editor at
Baltimore City Paper."


 

100 LASTING IMAGES FROM THE FREDDIE GRAY PROTESTS AND AFTERMATH IN BALTIMORE

Jerry Jackson, May 8, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"Over the past couple of weeks in Baltimore, thousands of images were produced that helped tell the story of the protests that followed the April 19, 2015, death of Freddie Gray, who sustained injuries while in police custody. Here are 100 of the more memorable photographs."



NATIONWIDE PROTESTS FOR FREDDIE GRAY

Emma Patti Harris, May 1, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"The death of Freddie Gray, the 25 year old Baltimore man who died in police custody, sparked protests in Ferguson, New York, Denver, Philadelphia and many other cities across the nation."



THE SIGNS OF THE BALTIMORE PROTESTS

Quinn Kelley, April 30, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"Freddie Gray, 25, died on April 19 — a week after he was injured while being arrested by Baltimore police. Video of an arrest surfaced, and an investigation is under way. Throughout the week, thousands of protesters have marched through the city, holding signs calling for reform and justice. Follow our comprehensive Freddie Gray coverage
here."

 



BALTIMORE RIOTS LEAVE BEHIND SHATTERED REMAINS

Denise Sanders, April 29, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"Many businesses were affected by the rioting that took place in Baltimore on Monday, April 27, 2015. The next day volunteers and owners of the stores and bars with windows broken, items taken by looters, and property destroyed boarded up windows and cleaned up the mess. Others boarded up their stores in preparation for more possible rioting about the death of Freddie Gray in police custody."

 



FROM THE VAULT: REMEMBERING BALTIMORE'S 1968 RIOTS

Kalani Gordon, April 28, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"The Baltimore riot of April 1968 was a long Palm Sunday weekend of contrasts from Saturday through Tuesday, and it wiped out much of the downtown business district.


People went to church and people looted. People were curious or scared to death. They went outside looking for adventure or to calm things down.


The skies were a sunny blue in one direction and black with smoke in another. Hundreds of city and state police officers were deployed to limit destruction in East and West Baltimore. Many merchants decried the lack of police protection for businesses. The sky was blackened with the smoke of 800 fires in 72 hours."



BALTIMORE AND THE FREDDIE GRAY CASE

Kalani Gordon, April 25, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun


"Freddie Gray, 25, died on April 19 — a week after
he was injured while being arrested by Baltimore police. Video of the arrest surfaced, protests have broken out and an investigation into his death is under way.

And now, the city is reacting. Here’s a look at the protests around the city and the reaction from the neighborhood where Freddie Gray lived — Sandtown."


ALL NIGHT, ALL DAY

Nate Larson*, April 29, 2015, natelarson.com


"Two days after the Baltimore uprising, I went to North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue. On Tuesday,
police in riot gear had locked down the block, creating a human blockade to prevent movement of people and traffic. When I arrived on Wednesday, the street was open and moving, and there were people gathered on each of the four corners.


Baltimore City residents were waiting and watching. The Baltimore Police Department was there, also waiting and watching, but this time in their standard uniforms. The national news media carried on all around, outnumbering the officers, and interviewing those present. Overhearing the conversations, the media was looking for material to reinforce their already formed opinions, and it seemed to have little to do with my city.


Tired of the abstraction of media narratives, I wanted to look carefully and to make portraits of individuals. I asked each BPD officer present if I could make their portrait, and made a portrait of each who consented. I then made portraits of community members who gave their consent. It felt important to put faces to both groups - I'm suspicious of easy narratives and think that the truth is much more complicated.


These photographs are a small way of knowing my city in this difficult time."


*Nate Larson is a Photography department faculty member.

Editorial Video Essays

A WALK WITH A BALTIMORE COP-WATCHER
Kalani Gordon, June 30, 2015, The Darkroom, The Baltimore Sun

"After a cellphone video of Freddie Gray in police custody at Gilmor Homes went viral, and helped lead to charges against the officers involved, Kevin Moore starts a WeCopwatch group in the area."

A tale of two Baltimores by RT America.

The Inner Harbor is Baltimore's jewel and its model of economic development. But just a few blocks east or west, the streets tell a different story--a city crumbling under the weight of foreclosures, unemployment and deepening poverty. Blocks of abandoned row houses and closed-down schools leave residents of this Baltimore little hope of a brighter future. But with one in six Americans living below the poverty line, is Baltimore a microcosm of the US?

Decker Library at the Maryland Institute College of Art | Location: 1401 W. Mount Royal Ave., Baltimore, MD 21217 | Mailing: 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave., Baltimore, MD 21217

Research Help: 410-225-2273 / refer@mica.edu | General Questions: 410-225-2272 / circ@mica.edu

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